Tagged: remembrance

November Events in Bristol

A selection of events involving us or our friends, and a couple we just think everyone should be at! From protests to pizza, come say hi and get involved.

Solidarity With Brazilian People
Bolsonaro has swept to power in Brazil and ushered in attacks on LGBTQ people, students, teachers and women. Stand with those confronting his fascist policies.
Friday Nov 9th 1.15pm – 3.15pm
Outside Senate House, Tyndall Avenue, BS8 1TH

Resist Surveillance!
Know your rights, resist state repression, fight back against control.
Friday Nov 9th
BASE, 14 Robertson Road, Easton BS5 6JY

Opening Bristol’s Borders
Fighting state control and standing in solidarity with Migrants!
Various Dates all November
Various Locations
a3
(click for big)

Free Shop!
Bristol Housing Action Movement host a free shop, browse, chat, listen to music and take away some free stuff. Leave donations of clothes, toys, household stuff,  or anything else someone might enjoy!
Saturday Nov 10th 1pm – 4pm
The Bear Pit

How Did World War 1 End?
Bristol Radical History & Remembering the Real WW1, looks at the truth behind often unanswered (and unasked) questions.
Saturday Nov 10th
1:30 pm to 4:30 pm
M Shed, BS1 4RN

Pizza and Anarchy!
BASE’s Sunday meal, with a chance to browse the radical library and info shop.
Sunday Nov 11th 6.30pm – 9pm
BASE 14 Robertson Road, Easton, BS5 6JY

Bristol Housing Action Fundraising Meal & Film Showing
BHAM are are a collective of squatters and homeless people fighting for housing and support in Bristol. Come get a vegan Lasagna & Dessert for £4.50, and watch ‘Dispossession, the great social housing swindle’.
Wednesday Nov 14th 6.30pm – 9.30pm
BASE 14 Robertson Road, Easton BS4 5JY

March For Mental Health
Student organised event to protest the lack of mental health support at Bristol university, and the uni’s refusal to deal with issues that contribute such as high rents.
Wednesday Nov 21st 1.15pm – 3.15pm
Senate House, Tyndall Avenue, BS8 1TH

Trans Pride South West
Now in it’s third year, Trans Pride’s aim is ‘celebrating diversity of Transgender, Non-Binary, Intersex & Gender Variant individuals. Actively encouraging awareness, openness & interaction.’
Wednesday Nov 21st – Sunday Nov 25tg
Various locations

Bristol Bus Protest
Bristol’s busses are a mess, and First are still laughing all the way to the bank. Let’s demand some change.
Saturday Nov 24th 12Midday
College Green

Reclaim the Night
Annual feminist march and rally reclaiming the night for those of us who are told the night belongs only to men. (all genders welcome)
Friday Nov 30th 6.30pm
Queen Square

 

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A previous year’s Reclaim the Night

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On How Many British Soldiers Tried Not To Kill Any Germans (and vise versa)

Hatred of the enemy, so strenuously fostered in training days, largely faded away in the line. We somehow realized that individually they were very like ourselves, just as fed-up and anxious to be done with it all

Much of the media discussion concerning WW1 over the last few years has been centred on the Courts-Martial and executions of so-called ‘cowards’ from the British Infantry between 1914-1918. This debate has been focussed on getting pardons for those who were shot (often in front of their comrades) on the basis they were ‘shell-shocked’ or suffering from ‘post-traumatic stress disorder’ rather than being ‘cowards’[5]. This victim-orientated narrative (there were 300 posthumous pardons issued by the state in 2006) implies that on the whole the issue of desertion and disobedience was limited to relatively isolated incidents[6]. Arguing about those who ‘refused’ the slaughter of WW1 on the basis of ‘cowardice’ or ‘mental illness’ provides both an exception to the rule (of supposed generally good discipline) and takes away the agency of soldiers, instead presenting the few miscreants as either embarrassing ‘gibbering weak-willed wrecks’ or deserving our sympathy as ‘damaged lunatics’. In contrast, very little attention has been paid to the mass of mutineers, strikers, agitators, shirkers and skulkers who were consciously and actively refusing and/or avoiding front-line combat and the war in general.

Mass refusals, disobedience, mutinies, strikes and out-right rebellion were all part of the British armed forces experience in WW1[7]These were all fairly explicit events and to a certain extent these hidden narratives are becoming part of the historical record despite the attempts of contemporary military censors and government ‘D’ notices on the press as well as the 100 year rule in suppressing military documents. Subsequent post-war collective memory loss related to dominant patriotic ideologies served to smother these events even further, but in the 1960s/70s a critical historical reappraisal of WW1 began, marked in the cultural sphere by the biting satire of the musical ‘Oh What a Lovely War’[8]. This reassessment of WW1 led to a series of historical and sociological examinations of the ‘life in the trenches’ in the succeeding decade. Some of these works provide a new and interesting angle on the subterranean (but at the same time mass) collective tactics British (and German) soldiers used for avoiding combat.

Read More From Bristol Radical History Group…